Call for Submissions #7 – The Language of Business

Theme 7

We want your words again.

When we say ‘words’ we want anything that involves you making noises; it’s only limited by what your mind can come up with and a time constraint: a maximum of five minutes in length. We’re interested in any style of writing, we want to show off the range of spoken word. These will be set to an ambient soundtrack, so we ask that the recordings are vocals only.

Recordings can be sent to lies.dreamingpodcast at gmail dot com by the 31st of October. 

The theme for the seventh podcast is The Language of Business.

Please interpret this in any way you like.

All submissions will receive a response within 10 days of the deadline passing.

Lies, Dreaming #5 – Do You Want Fries With That? pt.2

We are delighted to launch our fifth podcast on the theme of “Do You Want Fries With That?”. Here is the second and final part from that theme. You can stream it now via Soundcloud:

You can also subscribe to the podcast via iTunes. Android users should click here instead. Any positive ratings or reviews left on iTunes greatly appreciated.

A second instalment of spoken word based on this theme will be online in a couple of weeks. Meanwhile, here is a rundown of our contributors for this podcast:

Ian Richardson has been reading books and comics for years  which prepared him to deal with what he perceives as the random depths of the One Show. He is extremely happy that several of his written pieces have been published recently but still suffers from stage fright when he goes to perform them. Ian still enjoys writing bios in the third person, has given up drinking coffee late at night and sleeps more than he used to. You can find him here@IanRich10562022

Michael McGill is an Edinburgh-based performer who has appeared at Inky Fingers, Blind Poetics, The Accelerator and Last Monday at Rio.  He has also appeared as part of Big Word Performance Poetry and on The Verb on BBC Radio 3.  Recently, he has had work published in RAUM, New Walk, The Haiku Quarterly and on The Open Mouse and Hot Tub Astronaut websites.

Stephen Barnaby was raised by stoats and taught to communicate entirely through fifty snuffly, grunty noises, which he has successfully and randomly rearranged into two pamphlets, Self Loathing Ostrich Tragedy and It was Happy Hour at the Nutty Nun. He has worked hard at expanding his repertoire, culminating in last year’s naked appearances in the videos for ‘Wrecking Ball’ and ‘Blurred Lines.’ He insists, though, that he is emphatically not the plaything of an industry hell-bent on sexually objectifying bespectacled grey-haired men in their mid-forties. He can be contacted by leaving breadcrumbs in woodland clearings and hiding behind a tree.

Jenna Burns is an English Literature undergraduate at the University of Glasgow. She aspires to be an inspiring storyteller via page and screen. She also dreams of living in London and owning a cat- whichever comes first. She tweets under @Jenna_221b and blogs over at jenna221b.tumblr.com.

 

Lies, Dreaming #5 – Do You Want Fries With That? pt.1

We are delighted to launch our fifth podcast on the theme of “Do You Want Fries With That?”. You can stream it now via Soundcloud:

You can also subscribe to the podcast via iTunes. Android users should click here instead. Any positive ratings or reviews left on iTunes greatly appreciated.

A second installment of spoken word based on this theme will be online in a couple of weeks. eanwhile, here is a rundown of our contributors for this podcast:

Lisa Eaglesham: Lisa, just Lisa

Frederick “Freddie” Alexander is a writer and events organiser based in Edinburgh. Since 2013 he has been an organiser and host of the Inky Fingers Open Mic night, and has been an organiser of the University of Edinburgh Soapbox Open Mic. In 2014 he coordinated and hosted the second National UK University Poetry Slam. Having graduated in 2016 from the University of Edinburgh, he has begun working as a freelance writer, and has helped write op-eds with Katie Ailes and Claire Askew. He will be the Broadway Baby Spoken Word features columnist for the Edinburgh International Fringe Festival, 2016. Freddie has further interests in artistic entrepreneurship, and has hosted panel discussions and workshops with Entrepreneurial Scotland.

Dan Stathers’ debut poetry collection The Ink Cartridge Just Ran Out isn’t available any time soon. His poetry has been published in Yeah, Yeah, Whatever and most recently in But Am I Bothered. He’s a firm believer in the tropical fruit drink, Um Bongo, and a huge fan of Mike Priest.

Kevin Cadwallender lives in Edinburgh. He works as a Commissioning Editor for Red Squirrel Press. He was runner up in the BBC Slam at the Edinburgh Fringe and was Scottish National Slam Champion in 2012. He presented and organised the BBC Slam in 2014. Nominated for a Raymond Williams Community Publishing Award for his book ‘Voyages’ and shortlisted for a Sony Radio Award for the radio version of this broadcast on BBC Radio 4. He runs Tenred a poetry/prose/music night in Edinburgh.

 

Call for Submissions #6 – Iceland

P6 ICELAND

We want your words again.

When we say ‘words’ we want anything that involves you making noises; it’s only limited by what your mind can come up with and a time constraint: a maximum of five minutes in length. We’re interested in any style of writing, we want to show off the range of spoken word. These will be set to an ambient soundtrack, so we ask that the recordings are vocals only.

Recordings can be sent to lies.dreamingpodcast at gmail dot com by the 31st of August.

The theme for the sixth podcast is Iceland.

Please interpret this in any way you like.

All submissions will receive a response within 10 days of the deadline passing.

Call for Submissions #5

 

5 Fries Cover

We want your words.

When we say ‘words’ we want anything that involves you speaking words; it’s only limited by what your mind can come up with and a time constraint: a maximum of five minutes in length. We’re interested in any style of writing, we want to show off the range of spoken word. These will be set to an ambient soundtrack, so we ask that the recordings are vocals only.

Recordings can be sent to lies.dreamingpodcast at gmail dot com by the 30th of June, HOWEVER:

If we receive enough submissions to make a podcast before the 30th of June we will close the submission window early and not accept any more recordings.

The theme for the fifth podcast is DO YOU WANT FRIES WITH THAT?

Please interpret this in any way you like.

All submissions will receive a response within 10 days of the deadline passing.

 

Lies, Dreaming #4 – The One Show

We are delighted to launch our fourth podcast on the theme of “The One Show”. You can stream it now via Soundcloud:

You can also subscribe to the podcast via iTunes. Android users should click here instead.

Here is a rundown of our contributors:

Ian Richardson has been reading books and comics for years  which prepared him to deal with what he perceives as the random depths of the One Show. He is extremely happy that several of his written pieces have been published recently but still suffers from stage fright when he goes to perform them. Ian still enjoys writing bios in the third person, has given up drinking coffee late at night and sleeps more than he used to. You can find him here @IanRich10562022

Emily Elver writes poems and stories. She is the co-founder and editor of Freak Circus magazine. She can be found on Twitter @emilyelver

Lisa Eaglesham, 32 year old, Glasgow based ‘jack of all trades, master of none’! Has a background both in the field of counselling and previously in the field of acting. After years away from the acting profession – she decided to get the acting clogs on again for a bit of fun! Writing is something that allows her the freedom of self expression. Emotional depth is something that is important to her in her work as a counsellor and actor. This is her first written piece that she has ever submitted anywhere.

Dan Stathers’ debut poetry collection The Ink Cartridge Just Ran Out isn’t available any time soon. His poetry has been published in Yeah, Yeah, Whatever and most recently in But Am I Bothered. He’s a firm believer in the tropical fruit drink, Um Bongo, and a huge fan of Mike Priest.

Ali George is an Edinburgh based writer who mostly writes stories for children. You can find her work in Dactyl, Beyond the Horizon (from Bamboccioni Books) and all over the internet. She blogs at 12books12months.com

Peter U. Murphy: A Glaswegian aspiring writer, recipient of SAAS payments with the hope of one day owning a dog. Currently working on a short story style podcast, he writes mainly for pleasure and his degree. As a survivor of redundancy, he enjoys taking part in drama with Strathclyde Uni’s Re-Act Theatre Group, with which he has; written, acted and presided over. Normally too tentative to submit work he hopes that this will change soon.

Call for Submissions #4

The One Show

It’s Napowrimo time. Or ‘National Poetry Writing Month’ time if you’re not in a hurry.

What this means is all you poets out there have plenty of incentive for writing and recording spoken word pieces to send in for our fourth podcast. This doesn’t mean that all you prose writers out there can slack off. Oh no.

When we say ‘spoken word pieces’ we want anything that involves you speaking words; it’s only limited by what your mind can come up with and a time constraint: a maximum of five minutes in length. We’re interested in any style of writing, we want to show off the range of spoken word. These will be set to an ambient soundtrack, so we ask that the recordings are vocals only.

Recordings can be sent to lies.dreamingpodcast at gmail dot com by the 30th of April.

The theme for the podcast is THE ONE SHOW.

Please interpret this in any way you like. Surprise us.

All submissions will receive a response within 10 days of the deadline passing.

Podcast #3 – IKEA

We are delighted to launch our third podcast on the theme of IKEA. You can stream it now via Soundcloud.

You can also subscribe to the podcast via iTunes. Android users should click here instead.

Here is a rundown of our contributors:

Thomas Stewart is a Columnist for Litro NY and has had his fiction, poetry and essays published at The Cadaverine, The Stockholm Review, Rockland, Storgy, Anomaly, Agenda Broadsheet, among others. His debut poetry pamphlet, Creation is forthcoming from Red Squirrel Press. He has an MA in Writing from the University of Warwick and a BA in English from the University of South Wales. He enjoys folk music, horror films, suburban fiction, watches, cooking, patterned jumpers and beat poetry. He is afraid of the dark.

Max Scratchmann came into being as a flat pack form IKEA and was discontinued very soon after the original units were sold in the 1950s, so there are very few versions of him still around today.  However, he has been spotted on the poetry scene from time to time, and another incarnation of him appears to like to illustrate, while a third assembled unit seems to enjoy writing books and has produced lots of them.  Mostly as flat packs.

Dan Stathers has incredibly hairy knees. He enjoys talking nonsense in pubs and spends a great deal of his time at the bottom of a garden.

Michael McGill is an Edinburgh-based performer who has appeared at Inky Fingers, Blind Poetics, The Accelerator and Last Monday at Rio.  He has also appeared as part of Big Word Performance Poetry and on The Verb on BBC Radio 3.  Recently, he has had work published in RAUM, New Walk, The Haiku Quarterly and on The Open Mouse and Hot Tub Astronaut websites.

Stephen Barnaby was raised by stoats and taught to communicate entirely through fifty snuffly, grunty noises, which he has successfully and randomly rearranged into two pamphlets, Self Loathing Ostrich Tragedy and It was Happy Hour at the Nutty Nun. He has worked hard at expanding his repertoire, culminating in last year’s naked appearances in the videos for ‘Wrecking Ball’ and ‘Blurred Lines.’ He insists, though, that he is emphatically not the plaything of an industry hell-bent on sexually objectifying bespectacled grey-haired men in their mid-forties. He can be contacted by leaving breadcrumbs in woodland clearings and hiding behind a tree.

Nick Brooks is a novelist and poet who lives and works in Glasgow. He has twice won a Scottish Arts Council (now Creative Scotland) Writer’s Award, and most recently was awarded a stipend by the Royal Literary Fund. He has published three novels to date; My Name Is Denise Forrester (2005), and The Good Death (2007), both Weidenfeld & Nicolson, and Indecent Acts with Freight (2014). Forthcoming works include a collection of erotic haiku, called Sexy Haiku, due in 2015 through Freight, and a first collection of poetry, The Dog in the Disco, through Dive Buki in Slovakia, also due this year sometime. When not more gainfully employed, Nick is a full-time stalker with a pronounced limp.

Kevin P. Gilday is an award winning writer and spoken word artist based in Glasgow, Scotland. Kevin has been performing for five years, during which time he has solidified himself as one the foremost spoken word artists to emerge from the fertile Scottish poetry scene. Kevin has written four solo shows, completed two national tours, published two pamphlets and appeared at a whole host of festivals including Wickerman, Doune the Rabbithole, Lingo Festival (Dublin), the Edinburgh Fringe (three times), the Toronto Fringe and the Glastonbury Festival. Kevin also enjoys competing in slams for fun, miraculously winning a few (the StAnza Digital Slam, the Creative Stirling Slam, the Four Cities Slam) and has competed at the national finals on three occasions (coming 3rd twice). Kevin is also the host of Rhyming Optional, Glasgow’s dedicated spoken word radio show, and co-host of Sonnet Youth, a new alternative spoken word night for Scotland’s burgeoning scene.

Born but not bred in a market town in Fife, Stella Birrell‘s mum claims her line can be traced back to Genghis Khan via Russian Aristocracy, while her father’s grandparents were big in the Art Nouveau in Hungary at the beginning of the 20th Century. Despite the richness of this gene pool, Stella herself only appears to have inherited weak wrists, and a penchant for sitting down to write stories. Her debut novel, How Many Wrongs make a Mr Right? will be published by Crooked Cat Books in 2016.

Ian McKenzie has contributed poems to anthologies about Luddites, death and dog poo. His work has also featured in Raum Magazine. Whilst his house is full of IKEA furniture, he hates it almost as much as he hates the Royal Family, who probably think they are too good for IKEA. Bring on the flat-pack guillotine!’

Ian Richardson has been reading books and comics for years. Eventually, inevitably, he started writing. The first piece he ever wrote won a competition but he’s not been able to maintain that 100% success rate. He did have two pieces of poetry published in RAUM poetry magazine in 2015 and was overall winner in the Scottish Borders Waverley Lines contest. Ian enjoys writing bios in the third person, drinks a lot of coffee, doesn’t sleep much and is currently supposed to be working on the sequel to his e-book on Jukepop.

Alexandra Voutsina is an artist with an academic background in psychology, interior architecture and graphic design. She is trying to convey messages concerning the problematic issues of the contemporary world,  through different media. This media includes photography, graphic design, printing and creative writing.  To discover more about her work one can visit www.alexandravoutsina.com

Podcast #2 – Shakespeare Doesn’t Exist

Shakespeare Doesn't Exist

We are delighted to launch our second podcast on the theme of Shakespeare Doesn’t Exist. You can stream it now via Soundcloud.

You can also subscribe to the podcast via iTunes.

Here is a rundown of our contributors:

Rachel Rankin has been doing spoken word for about 4 years but has been writing a lot longer than that. She has performed at shows and competitions all across the UK, including being part of the winning team for Unislam, the UK’s first inter-university poetry slam, in 2013. She has also been involved with a poetry collective in Bergen, Norway, and has performed with them in many shows. She hosts and organisers for Soapbox, Edinburgh University’s open-mic night. When she’s not doing poetry she is either reading about Vikings or crying over her future career prospects as a graduate of English Literature and Scandinavian Studies.

Born in County Durham, Martin Malone now lives in Scotland. He has published two poetry collections: The Waiting Hillside (Templar, 2011) and Cur (Shoestring, 2015). An Honorary Research Fellow in Creative Writing at Aberdeen University, he is currently studying for a Ph.D in poetry at Sheffield University. He edits The Interpreter’s House poetry journal.

Having written verse since primary school, evolving through teen-angst poems and emotional outpourings, Annaliza Davis now spends most of her writing hours producing magazine features and tourism pieces but shoe-horns in sufficient hours to publish short stories and the occasional verse. Based in France since 2004, her passion for writing is consistently challenged by very real concerns such as paying bills and spending time with her family. The truth is, she spends more time with her laptop than her husband and more hours dealing with email than writing up any 4am flashes of inspiration. It is strongly hoped that this will change during 2016.

Nick Brooks is a novelist and poet who lives and works in Glasgow. He has twice won a Scottish Arts Council (now Creative Scotland) Writer’s Award, and most recently was awarded a stipend by the Royal Literary Fund. He has published three novels to date; My Name Is Denise Forrester (2005), and The Good Death (2007), both Weidenfeld & Nicolson, and Indecent Acts with Freight (2014). Forthcoming works include a collection of erotic haiku, called Sexy Haiku, due in 2015 through Freight, and a first collection of poetry, The Dog in the Disco, through Dive Buki in Slovakia, also due this year sometime. When not more gainfully employed, Nick is a full-time stalker with a pronounced limp.

Stephen Barnaby was raised by stoats and taught to communicate entirely through fifty snuffly, grunty noises, which he has successfully and randomly rearranged into two pamphlets, Self Loathing Ostrich Tragedy and It was Happy Hour at the Nutty Nun. He has worked hard at expanding his repertoire, culminating in last year’s naked appearances in the videos for ‘Wrecking Ball’ and ‘Blurred Lines.’ He insists, though, that he is emphatically not the plaything of an industry hell-bent on sexually objectifying bespectacled grey-haired men in their mid-forties. He can be contacted by leaving breadcrumbs in woodland clearings and hiding behind a tree.

Alasdair Stewart Goudie was born in this particular universe on July 19th, 1998, intolerant to dairy and vegan and artistically inclined, and has since been unable to shut up about any of those things. He plans to be a Creative Writing lecturer and writer, so has been aware of how much of a pipe dream his career plans are long before his peers.  His favourite writers are Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett, and other white British males with fantasy leanings, although some days he might read a book by a Jamaican author and post about the lack of racial diversity in publishing on Tumblr. He also speaks in the third person, as is evident by all prior.

Ian Richardson has been reading books and comics for years. Eventually, inevitably, he started writing. The first piece he ever wrote won a competition but he’s not been able to maintain that 100% success rate. He did have two pieces of poetry published in RAUM poetry magazine in 2015 and was overall winner in the Scottish Borders Waverley Lines contest.. Ian enjoys writing bios in the third person, drinks a lot of coffee, doesn’t sleep much and is currently supposed to be working on the sequel to his e-book on Jukepop.

Max Scratchmann is one half of the Poetry Circus as well as being an illustrator, writer and performer. He was a big hit at the Edinburgh Festival with his one-man-show, Moving Pictures, and was one of the four Inky Fingers’ Poets on a Bus at the Edinburgh History Festival. He is a co-founder of FREAK Circus magazine and lives in Edinburgh in a depressingly cat-free household.

Zanetta Denny is an aspiring writer from West London. She is developing a zine called Creolita. She graduated from King’s College London in 2009 with a degree in European Studies and French and holds an NCTJ in Newspaper Journalism in 2013. She loves Gabriel García Márquez and Arundhati Roy.