Lies, Dreaming #17 – Tell me something I don’t know

We are delighted to announce the contributors for our seventeenth podcast, which has as its theme “Tell me something I don’t know”.

You can subscribe to the podcast using the links on the right.

Here is a rundown of our contributors:

Becky Downing is a Liverpool-based, Actor, Poet & Playwright. She began writing for Theatre in the Rough in 2012 and has since created work for various festivals & projects with the Company including ‘A Concept of Beauty’ for the Liverpool and the Titanic Fest (2012), ‘The Jewellery box’ for the Lusitania Exhibition (2015) and a short audio play, ‘Haunted Sefton’ in 2016. Since then, Becky has been writing Poetry for her website, toured with Want The Moon Theatre Company this year playing ‘Joss’ in ‘Other People’s Teeth’,  and has just written & Performed her one woman show ‘We’ve Been Bette’ at theatre 503, London.

Kathryn Thomson is a Scottish poet currently living in Glasgow. After a degree in Scottish Literature and Language, she now works part-time as a freelance poet and has worked closely and written for a number of third-sector organisations. She also produces monthly email newsletters that you can sign up to here. Find her on Instagram and her Website.

Ellen Storey is a writer and editor living in Aberdeenshire.  She has been writing since childhood and edited her mother’s memoirs of post-war Germany which were published in 2009. She enjoys taking part in workshops/projects, and wrote for the EU-funded Dovetail partnership in Nottingham which published an anthology in 2014. She also contributed a biographical chapter to Women’s Voices, Women’s Words published by Global Press in 2016.

Michael McGill is an Edinburgh poet who has recently had work published in Far Off Places, Picaroon Poetry, The Haiku Quarterly, Likely Red Press and Eye Flash Poetry Journal.

Twitter: @MMcGill09

Our next theme will be ‘The Nightshift at McDonalds’. Check out this blogpost for further details.

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Call for Submissions #18 – The Nightshift at McDonalds

We want your words. Your words inspired by the theme ‘The Nightshift at McDonalds’.

When we say ‘we want your words’ we want anything that involves you making noises; it’s only limited by what your mind can come up with and a time constraint: a maximum of five minutes in length (a limit, rather than a target). We’re interested in any style of writing, we want to show off the range of spoken word. We are happy to broadcast previously published works.

Whatever you send, the podcast will be set to an ambient soundtrack, so we ask that the recordings are vocals only. Preferred audio formats are mp3 and wav files. Please save your file with your name and poem title.

Recordings can be sent to lies.dreamingpodcast at gmail dot com by the 31st of January 2019 for a podcast at the end of February.

The theme for the podcast is The Nightshift at McDonalds.

We’re looking forward to your responses!

All submissions will receive a response within 10 days of the deadline passing.

Contributors to the podcast will receive a payment of £5.

Lies, Dreaming #16 – Supermarket Sweep

We are delighted to announce the contributors for our sixteenth podcast, which has as its theme “Supermarket Sweep”.

You can subscribe to the podcast using the links on the right.

Here is a rundown of our contributors:

David Ralph Lewis is a Bristol based poet and writer. He is currently working on a book of sci-fi shorts and a blackout poetry collection. He has just released ‘Spare Parts’, a collaborative blackout poetry chapbook which is available through his website: www.davidralphlewis.co.uk

Nalini Paul is a widely-published poet based in Glasgow. She graduated with a PhD on Jean Rhys and postcolonial subjectivity in 2008 and has since developed her collaborative practice (with actors, musicians, visual artists, archaeologists in Orkney and the RSPB). In 2017 she was a Robert Louis Stevenson Fellow in France. Soon after, she was commissioned by the Edinburgh International Book Festival and An Lanntair Arts to travel to Lewis and Kolkata as part of the ‘New Passages’ project. www.nalinipaul.com

Becky Downing is a Liverpool-based, Actor, Poet & Playwright. She began writing for Theatre in the Rough in 2012 and has since created work for various festivals & projects with the Company including ‘A Concept of Beauty’ for the Liverpool and the Titanic Fest (2012), ‘The Jewellery box’ for the Lusitania Exhibition (2015) and a short audio play, ‘Haunted Sefton’ in 2016. Since then, Becky has been writing Poetry for her website, toured with Want The Moon Theatre Company this year playing ‘Joss’ in ‘Other People’s Teeth’,  and has just written & Performed her one woman show ‘We’ve Been Bette’ at theatre 503, London.

Sean Wai Keung’s debut poetry pamphlet you are mistaken won the inaugural Rialto Open Pamphlet Competition 2016 and was named a Poetry School ‘book of the year’. In 2018 he released how to cook, a food-poem pamphlet, with Speculative Books. Find him on twitter @SeanWaiKeung or at www.seanwaikeung.com

Our next theme will be ‘Tell me something I don’t know’. Check out this blogpost for further details.

Call for Submissions #17 – Tell me something I don’t know

 

We want your words. Your words inspired by the theme ‘Tell me something I don’t know’.

When we say ‘we want your words’ we want anything that involves you making noises; it’s only limited by what your mind can come up with and a time constraint: a maximum of five minutes in length (a limit, rather than a target). We’re interested in any style of writing, we want to show off the range of spoken word. We are happy to broadcast previously published works.

Whatever you send, the podcast will be set to an ambient soundtrack, so we ask that the recordings are vocals only. Preferred audio formats are mp3 and wav files.

Recordings can be sent to lies.dreamingpodcast at gmail dot com by the 15th of November 2018 for a podcast at the end of November.

The theme for the podcast is Tell me something I don’t know.

We’re looking forward to your responses!

All submissions will receive a response within 10 days of the deadline passing.

Contributors to the podcast will receive a payment of £5.

Lies, Dreaming #15 – Neighbours

We are delighted to announce the contributors for our fifteenth podcast, which has as its theme “Neighbours”.

You can subscribe to the podcast using the links on the right.

Here is a rundown of our contributors:

Colin McGuire is a poet and performer from Glasgow based in Edinburgh, who recently  won both the Out:Spoken Award for Poetry-in-Film, with his animation collaboration ‘The Glasgae Boys’, and the Out:Spoken overall Prize for Poetry. He is the author of three collections. His first self-published collection, ‘Riddled with errors’ (Clydesidepress, 2003), and his first chapbook, ‘Everybody lie down and no one gets hurt,’ (Red Squirrel Press, 2013), and his first full collection, ‘As I sit quietly, I begin to smell burning,’ (Red Squirrel Press, 2014). He has just released ‘enhanced doom disclosure’ with Speculative Books. www.colinmcguirepoet.co.uk

Edinburgh-based Jay Whittaker’s debut poetry collection, Wristwatch, was published by Cinnamon Press in October 2017.  She writes about transition, resilience, grief, breast cancer, and LGBT+ lives (including her own). Her poems have been widely published and she has performed feature sets at StAnza, Interrobang, Platform Poetry, and Shore Poets. www.jaywhittaker.uk

Catherine Wilson is a poet, writer and performer currently living in Edinburgh. Her work has been commissioned by the National Gallery, TEDx, BBC Radio 4 and BBC Radio Scotland. She is one of the main organisers of “Loud Poets”: a collective committed to making poetry accessible to everyone.

Michael McGill is an Edinburgh-based poet who has recently had work published in Rock & Sling, Funhouse Magazine, New Walk, Northwords Now, Obsessed with Pipework, The Haiku Quarterly and Ink, Sweat and Tears.

Twitter: @MMcGill09

Our next theme will be ‘Supermarket Sweep’. Check out this blogpost for further details.

So…you want to do an open mic night

Open mic nights are essential for the arts to develop. It’s where people find their voice, try out new things, and make the first step on that infinitely long ladder marked ’emerging artist’.

However, they’re also a place where you might find yourself picking things up as you go along. You’re often going in with just you, your words and no other knowledge.

Here then is a list of things that you should know about when you go to your first open mic. If there’s anything missing please mention it in the comments.

1. Actually go to some open mics first.

Open mics may all have similar formats but they all have different characters. Find the ones that feel right to you, and consider it from an audience perspective. This will help inform your performance and technique.

It will also help you deal with the drinking culture that exists at poetry nights. Often they’re in pubs or BYOB events, and your tolerance is something only you can know. No matter how nervous you get, it’s best not to get pissed before you go on stage.

2. Getting a slot may take time

Search engines or asking friends for advice should present you with some of the open mics in your area. Usually they will put out a request for open mic-ers in the weeks before hand, and ask people to email in requests.

It is possible that they will get more requests than there are slots, so you may not get a place straight away but you should get first rejection for the next event. There may also be dropouts on the night, so you might get put on a reserve list for when this happens.

3. Practice beforehand

Before you go, make sure you practice your pieces. This helps your confidence and gives you a sense of how long your pieces are.

Time them to make sure they don’t go over the limit (this should be given to you in advance). Remember to include patter in your timings. If the only way to finish the pieces is to rush through them, cut one so you can do it properly. If If you’re going over time, either cut the number of pieces you’re reading or perform something else instead.

You want people to like your work, so don’t wang on either really fast or for too long and lose any goodwill you might have gained.

Don’t worry about making a mistake: bear in mind only you know what your poem should sound like, so if you do make a mistake only you will notice. Just continue with the poem rather than trying to go back and fix your mistake.

4. Reading from paper

Reading from paper is fine, if that’s how you prefer to perform. Also it’s likely to be a new piece you’re reading so you’re forgiven for not knowing it off by heart yet.

However, I would recommend that you do not read from individual sheets of paper held in your hand, and instead use a notebook or pad. This is because you’re probably going to be nervous when performing, and if you’re holding sheets of paper they will shake with your nerves. When you notice this it can make you more nervous. Reading from a notepad (with the words written in pencil initially so they’re easier to edit) means it’s much less obvious when you’re nervous as there’s no rustling noise and so this cyclical problem of nerves doesn’t occur.

5. Patter

If you’re nervous, just concentrate on greeting the audience and saying what the name of your poem is. That’s all they need to know. Try to practice this along with the poems beforehand. As you get more confident from repeated performances you’ll get better at talking to the audience (and indeed you will repeat the same patter between poems), but when you’ve got a time limit it’s best not to ramble.

Never self-deprecate. 

6. The microphone

If there is a microphone, use it. Do not assume everyone in the audience is able to hear you without your voice being amplified.

Before we get to the actual microphone, there’s the stand to consider. Microphone stands are adjustable, usually there’s a locking mechanism halfway down the pole which can be loosened when spun to the left or tightened when spun to the right (aka ‘righty tighty, lefty loosy’). If the mic isn’t at the same height as your mouth when you stand normally, loosen this and raise/lower the pole accordingly, then tighten it.

You want the mic to be at mouth height, and you want to speak into it directly, so don’t move around too much or else the sound quality fluctuates. Don’t put your mouth right up to the mic, a few inches away is fine. If you’re speaking directly into it your voice will get picked up.

7. How to end a poem

It isn’t usually that clear when a poem has finished. A simple nod and a ‘thank you’ is a good way of marking this.

Other ways to mark the end use visual clues such as stepping backwards from the mic. If you’re reading from a notepad, you can close it to signal that you’ve finished.

8. Do not fuck off after you’ve finished your slot

If you have no urgent business to attend to, stay and watch the other performers. Obviously it’s polite to do so, but you might actually learn something/be inspired/enjoy it. Plus no one will think you are a dick.

NB. if you are a dick, stop being a dick.

9. You will get feedback, just not necessarily in detail

You always get feedback at open mic nights. You can see the audience, you can hear how they’re reacting to your work, you can gauge the weariness of their applause. If you’re doing a comedic piece, then it’s a lot easier to tell if that’s worked. For anything that isn’t designed to evoke laughter it’s a bit harder to tell.

You will probably not get more detailed feedback than this, though some nights do encourage it.

10. This is where you can fail

The whole point of open mic nights is to try things out. Some of them will not work. This is fine. This is how you find out which things you’ve written are good. If you get offered a feature slot you should know which of your pieces people like from doing open mic nights.

Do not use feature slots to try out lots of new material, that’s what the open mic nights are there for.

With thanks to Matt McDonald, Lloyd Robinson, Finola Scott, Alistair Mackey, David Paton, Paul Case, Gavin Cruickshank, Dave Lee Morgan, and David Macpherson.

Call for Submissions #16 – Supermarket Sweep

We want your words. Your words…inspired by Supermarket Sweep.

When we say ‘we want your words’ we want anything that involves you making noises; it’s only limited by what your mind can come up with and a time constraint: a maximum of five minutes in length (a limit, rather than a target). We’re interested in any style of writing, we want to show off the range of spoken word. We are happy to broadcast previously published works.

Whatever you send, the podcast will be set to an ambient soundtrack, so we ask that the recordings are vocals only. Preferred audio formats are mp3 and wav files.

Recordings can be sent to lies.dreamingpodcast at gmail dot com by the 31st of July 2018 for a podcast at the end of August.

The theme for the podcast is, in honour of the late Dale Winton, Supermarket Sweep.

We’re looking forward to your responses!

All submissions will receive a response within 10 days of the deadline passing.

Contributors to the podcast will receive a payment of £5.

Headset #5- Kath Macfarlane

We’re delighted to introduce the fourth of our new Headset format, thirteen minutes of spoken word from Kath Macfarlane. You can buy it from our Bandcamp page below, or get it by subscribing to our podcast via the links on the right.

 

INFORMATION:

By day Katharine Macfarlane is a librarian, sharing stories and songs with children of all ages. At night she reads poems to grown ups. Her poetry is rooted in the landscape and history of the west of Scotland and draws inspiration from traditional Scottish stories and songs alongside myths and legends from the wider Celtic and Norse world. A regular performer at spoken word events across west and central Scotland her work has been broadcast on BBC Radio nan Gàidheal and The Grind on Castle FM and has appeared in The Grind Journal and the Write Angle and [untitled] magazine. She is currently the Harpies, Fechters and Quines Slam Champion.

The poems that appear in this podcast are:

Belonging
Changeling
One for sorrow
Listen

You can find out more about Katharine at the following links:
en-gb.facebook  more

Headset #4- Colin Bramwell

We’re delighted to introduce the fourth of our new Headset format, thirty minutes of spoken word from Colin Bramwell. You can buy it from our Bandcamp page below, or get it by subscribing to our podcast via the links on the right.

 

INFORMATION:

Umbrella Man by Colin Bramwell

Bohori by Yang Mu, translated by Wenchi Li and Colin Bramwell, from Yang Mu, Hawk of the Mind: Collected Poems, edited by Michelle Yeh, and available from Columbia University Press in Spring 2018.

‘I Think It’s Gonna Rain Today’ by Randy Newman.

All other poems, texts and translations by Colin Bramwell. Piano and other music also by Colin Bramwell, sound design and mastering from Rob MacNeacail.

With special thanks to John Osborne and Eva Rodriguez Paredes.